Introduction to Why Food Labelling is Needed?

Food labelling is a very important part of your products packaging. With so much choice and variety in today’s market, it can be hard to know what you should be eating. That’s why food labelling is so important. It tells us about the ingredients in a food and any special storage or cooking instructions (use-by dates and fixed weight). It provides information on nutrient content (e.g., energy, fat content), so that consumers can compare different products. And finally, it helps us with dietary restrictions or allergies (e.g., gluten-free, nut-free).

Food Labels help consumers make good choices about the food they buy.

Food labelling helps consumers make good choices about the food they buy.

  • It helps consumers make healthy choices by giving them information about what is in a food. How it was produced and where it comes from.
  • It helps them choose foods that are right for them, such as low salt or low fat products.
  • It also informs people of potential allergens (for example, peanuts) so they can avoid buying something that might cause an allergic reaction to themselves or someone else in their family .

Most importantly, food labelling regulations give consumers confidence about the safety of their food – whether it’s grown locally or imported from overseas – making sure everything is safe before going onto shop shelves here at home in the United Kingdom.

Tells us about the ingredients in a food and any special storage or cooking instructions (use-by dates and fixed weight).

Food labelling tells us about the ingredients in a food and any special storage or cooking instructions (use-by dates and fixed weight).

Eating well means knowing what you’re eating. Food labelling helps you to make informed choices, but it can be confusing.

Food producers list their ingredients in order of weight, so you should find the ingredient that poses the biggest health risk first. If there is a question about the safety of an ingredient, it should be listed first.

The use-by date is the last day that a product should be eaten at its best quality – this doesn’t mean it’s dangerous after this date, just that over time some nutrients may deteriorate. The fixed weight is how much your cooked product weighs before serving/eating – for example if a tinned soup has 400g listed as its fixed weight then when you open it up and pour into your bowl this would mean 100mls per serving if served with pasta shapes (not included)

Provides information on nutrient content (eg, energy, fat content), so that consumers can compare different products.

Food labelling provides information on nutrient content (eg, energy, fat content), so that consumers can compare different products. Nutrient levels in food are often expressed as a percentage of the recommended daily intake (% RDI). For example, if a product label says “sugar 6g per 100g” it means the food contains 6g of sugar out of 100g of total weight.

The following nutrients have % RDI values assigned to them:

  • Energy – for adults and children over 4 years old it is 8400kJ (2000kcal) per day; for infants under 1 year old it is 4000kJ (1000kcal) per day; for toddlers aged 1–3 years old it is 7400kJ (1800kcal) per day; for preschoolers aged 3–5 years old it is 9000 kJ (2000 kcal) per day; for school-aged children aged 5–10 years old it is 11700 kJ (2500 kcal) per day; for adolescents aged 10–18 years old it is 15500 kJ (3000 kcal) per day; and finally 19+ adults require 12000 kJ or 2800 kcal as an average energy requirement.

Help us with dietary restrictions or allergies (eg, gluten-free, nut-free).

Label reading has two primary benefits for those who have dietary restrictions or allergies. First, knowing what’s in your food allows you to make more informed choices about what you eat. Second, it helps protect against accidental exposure to allergens that can cause serious health problems.

For example, if you’re vegan or lactose intolerant and don’t read labels carefully enough before buying certain products, then you might accidentally pick up something containing animal ingredients or lactose (milk sugar). Similarly, someone with nut allergies could accidentally purchase a product containing nuts if they didn’t notice the allergen warning on the packaging—not only would this person be at risk of experiencing an allergic reaction but also everyone who eats this product will be exposed to whatever was used as an allergen substitute (for instance peanuts in peanut butter).

Knowing what is in your food helps you make better choices.

Knowing what is in your food helps you make better choices.

Food labelling tells us the ingredients in a food and any special storage or cooking instructions. It also provides information on nutrient content, including energy, fat and protein as well as fibre, salt/sodium and sugars.

It can help with dietary restrictions or allergies to gluten or lactose for example by indicating if the product contains these ingredients.

Conclusion

If you have any questions about the food labelling please get in touch with our friendly team and we will help with all your label printing needs. 

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